I Pray for Tohoku

Kanji Tohoku PrayerThe birds were singing peacefully and the scent of blue bonnets hung in the air. It was unlike any other day, the playful voices of the neighbors next door were not to be heard; the old woman was not sitting on her porch knitting the colorful yarn. The humming TV in the humid living room showed burning houses, upside-down trucks, and a great wall of the roaring tsunami: the scene enveloping inside the scratchy TV was absolute hell— I can perfectly recall five years ago, when I was gazing dauntingly at the screen in front of me on a typical Texan day. 11,000 kilometers away, there were people suffering severely, with scarcely little hope of being spared by God or any other evangelical figure. March 11, 2011. It dawned on me how mystical and yet horrifying a deadly catastrophe could trigger the utmost casualties.

People believe that they are invincible, that they are the most powerful creatures on the face of the whole planet. People are disillusioned that they are somewhat immune to disasters; they are obsolete-minded to the point that they are indifferent to the idea of even suffering for a natural cause. But I believe, sadly, that this is how intrinsic human nature works. It feels like a wretched and inevitable aspect.

March 11. This date brings back so many memories; from the rustling trees outside my yard to the crackling voices of reporters who were struggling to get a glimpse of what human life was left in Tohoku.

Far away, people were praying. The vengeance of the tsunami and earthquake was conspicuously felt and considered when the little screen played the scene where a dark, opaque wall of water crashed down on the villages and towns.

I urge people not to forget the day our families and friends suffered, and urge strongly for people to reflect upon the circumstances and risks that are prevalent. It comes so fast, and doesn`t go away any quicker. The shadows of memories linger inside everybody`s heart. But we must remember: we are not alone.

We must never forget, and we must not forget to move on.

I pray for Tohoku.

Kanji Yamamoto

K.Y.’s Final Reflection

Enduring, adapting, reflecting…What was it that I learned throughout the entire journey; from eating the tangy, colourful candy to laughing and crying with people who have lost their families and homes to perishing disasters, one cannot have gone through an experience that I have gone through, and this, I am very confident of. This is my story with the bold letters that have my name on the cover of the book: not anyone else, but only me. The defining factor of what makes you a suitable and passionate person does not lie on his or her professional careers nor does it take hard, robust work for one to make a lavish and comfortable lifestyle from scratch. Life is complicated, yet simple, just like these words. And this also applies to the people we have interacted with and shared our ideas with.

We live in a diverse environment; more acutely said, we are mostly lain in an international society where some things are innovated, while others are forgotten. In Japan, this may apply to the co-existence of nature and civilians. In Washington DC, this can probably be described in terms of forming bonds with our neighbours or friends. There are things that cannot be seen and processed with one simple glance; there is a need for people to go in depth, to dive into a situation, just to understand and comprehend it. Idiom-wise, I can explain this by saying: don’t judge a book by its cover.

This life-engaging journey with my fellow colleagues: it is something that will last forever and structurally form new perspectives. The importance of traveling to unseen places and sharing ideas with people who have diverse backgrounds; the necessity of this is something that I have learned throughout this entire trip. There are not only dull, heart-breaking failures in this world, but also a ray of hope for people to live a more enhanced and suitable life. It is my hope for this ideology to come true, and I will fight for it. Thank you TOMODACHI.

Keio Shonan Fujisawa Senior High School

DC: A City of Inspiring Words

Quote-Yuki-Darkness smY.A. – This is a quote I picked up from Martin Luther King JR. Memorial. I was simply amazed how he expressed this thought. Actually I knew there are these kind of thoughts such as non-violent protesting, but now I totally understand what it meant. And as he said in his quote, his way of fighting against stereotypes, racism and the discrimination was talking and telling the story to the others. His quote let me recognize the way how “we” solve these problems as global leaders.

Quotes-Nina-ComfortN.Y. – “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”


I like this quote because these words show us how to live. Living in comfortable and convenient place is easy. People’s mind wont be restricted and we can be what we want to be. On the other hand, when we are challenging something or having a controversy with people, it is not easy time. We have to live in pressure. However, I believe that people can grow much more in hard time because we have to think so many things and take an action. I have kind of experience of this. I was belonging to tennis club, which was said that is a most hard girls’ club in junior and senior high school. That rumor was true and I had spent hard time in both physical and mental side. However it was enrich time. I trained my body and mental.

Because of this experience, I believe that people should put themselves in to hard situations, and I think this thinking is not wrong. So, I could connect my thinking to this quote.

Today, life is becoming easier because of the technology development. We have to find hard way to make ourselves strong. The ultimate measure of a man is where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

N.M. – “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience. But where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

The second I read this quote, I realized how it perfectly fits our whole group. As participants of an exchange program, we need to do our best to step out of our ‘comfort’ zones and ‘challenge’ new things in order to learn about new cultures and perspectives.

Quote-Korey-Love PeaceKorey – This quote speaks to me because it talks about how we should focus more on peace and not entirely on war. I want to live in a peaceful world where I don’t have any fears of war or destruction.

Quote-I Have A DreamK.Y. – “I have a dream…” The sensational words of the great Martin Luther King blows through the metropolitan city of Washington D.C. even today. Powerful and inspirational, those first lines of King`s speech made me think deeply; for, what my next goal is to pursue my dreams and accomplish my goals.

Quotes-Injustice AnywhereDusan – Upon seeing this quote at the MLK memorial, I stopped to think about its significance. In the past week, a theme came up along the lines of being an ally to justice, such as helping to stop police brutality when it happens by watching. This same quote applies to that same notion, and that is no coincidence. Everything that happens to one does affect another indirectly if we take the time to look at our lives and the lives around us. For example, if I ignored a police brutality incident before my eyes, that would not help the situation for anyone that police brutality applies to in the future, including myself. In fact, I could end up being brutalized because I never tried to take any initiative to stop that injustice from occurring. I’ll end with this: Buddha once said something along this line before, and if MLK said it as well, then someone before MLK and after Buddha most likely said it as well. If it is oft repeated throughout history, then it would be wise to take heed of it. So, ‘till next time….

August 4: Our Most Vivid Impressions

PROGRAM NOTE: On August 4th, the day started with a workshop presented by Operation Understanding DC (OUDC) to better understand prejudice and stereotypes.The day continued at the Thurgood Marshall Center in the historic Shaw community of Washington with a closer examination of historic and current issues affecting the African American community. Speakers included Rock Newman, Ronald Hampton, and the Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop.

Rock and Ron GroupAndres

Today we spoke about prejudice and racism here in the United States. It was very powerful being in front of Rock Newman during his speech. He told the truth behind how the Police today even have bias for whites and blacks. Mr. Newman also treated us to soul food which was delicious. We had macaroni and cheese, fried chicken, collard greens, and BBQ meatballs. It was very delicious and at the same time while eating I consumed this knowledge of truth that prejudice still exists in America.

Soul Food9K.Y.

Out of all the talks, people and workshops we had interacted with today, what stood out most was Rock Newman`s discussion. The reason for this was the way he influenced the audience, his strong and magical words surged into each of us like a gush of wind. Because the words and his tone were full of determination and powerful legitimacy, I was initially moved and awe-stricken just by his presence. What he had expressed was the corrupt nation of the United States, which ‘everyone is equal and that people regardless of their skin color or size are treated equal’. He told stories of his past where he dealt with racial discrimination that proved opposite. He said everyone should be treated with mutual respect and dignity. I hope to pass on his courageous story to other people.

Rock Newman1Shigetatsu

I’d like to write about the Free Minds Book Club. I was impressed by them strongly because of their ways and thought and operation.

There are a lot of people who are in prison because they did something illegal. Most people, including me, tend to avoid communicating with the criminals. It’s a very natural thing but also a serious issue we need to tackle. Usually, we only see issues that are broadcasted widely like 3/11 tsunami or 9/11 terrorists attack. However there are various issues that are needed to be solved in our society.

FM Tara and MajorFree Minds Book Club is an organization which focuses on such issues and is now helping lots of people. We met Major who was a participant in Free Minds when he was in prison. He was not so sensitive and talkable but his stories he did share were very powerful. He also shared his poem on how he appreciates woman. Books also have significant meanings to help people get other perspectives and knowledge especially while they’re in prison.

I recognized that there are issues we are expected to consider that are surrounding us. Also we have to try to solve them in an effective way. Probably the whole procedure and solution to many of these problems is the social entrepreneurship. Free Minds is a really good example.

Free Minds Gift to Major SmilingY.A.

Things are busy and were kind of overwhelming for me today, though we are just starting the DC part of this program. In the morning, I have got two biographies and pictures two men we were to meet. One was a white man and the other one was a black man. Later it turned out my hypothesis and assumptions were not correct, but at that time, that is what I really thought. As I read the biographies I even thought “isn’t it hard for a white man to criticize the discrimination made by white man even though he knows it was a terrible thing?” In conclusion, both men I read about were black man and I was surprised.

One of them was Rock Newman who doesn’t seem like a black man at all. He had white skin, and also blue eyes. Even if I was not Asian, I would think even Americans would see Mr. Newman and think he was white. He told us his story of struggle of looking white although he is actually considered and categorized as a black man. Even though Barack Obama has been a president and there seems to be no discrimination or prejudice that exists between black and white persons, there are still some in people’s minds. Before Obama and earlier in time there was more discrimination between blacks and white as one could easily guess. And I think Mr. Newman had experienced what he didn’t need to experience. For example, he said a lot of whites talked to him making fun of black people or criticize black people since they thought he was a white man which would never happen if he looked like a black man. Since he is a black man, and since he chooses to live as a black man, and since he decided to fight for black men, he had to face these criticisms he didn’t have to face. As I just mentioned he didn’t use his “advantage” of looking like a white man at all in the time of segregation and prejudice. I was just surprised and amazed by his courage and power which makes this United States keeps succeeding with DIVERSE SOCIETY.

Ron Hampton2Caitie

Today was a lot of work on defying and understanding stereotypes and their power. The main lesson I took from OUDC, Free Minds, and the Rock and Ron conversations was that you cannot let stereotypes define you or anyone else. Stereotypes, whether positive or negative, leave you never able to understand the person for who they are. We cannot get rid of stereotypes, and we cannot just pretend they don’t exist. But instead, we can know they exist, and get to know the person for who they really are rather than your first impression. And I think that’s a really powerful lesson.


Thurgood Marshall4Today was very interesting, especially because we met in the Thurgood Marshall building in the U St neighborhood. I didn’t know this building even exists and I live in the same neighborhood! It proves that many young people don’t value the historical landmarks in our city or are just ignorant to their existence. During our meeting we got the privilege to meet and listen to Rock Newman. He made so many strong points about prejudices and racism back in the day. But the passion in Newman’s voice made his words even powerful. He was my favorite speaker of the day.


Today we met a lot of new people who were so powerful that I had to form new perspectives inside me. We met Rock, who told us about his past, how black people have been treated, and how they are still treated now. His stories of prejudice against him were painful and powerful to hear. If I am to change the world somehow, I think I would have to be like Rock, to be able to even sacrifice yourself to save someone.


Today we went to Thurgood Marshall Center and listened to many stories. First story was from Rock Newman, who looks like a white person but is an African American. He told us his experience and it was very fearful. Also he talked about media. When news told about some crime, those criminals are mostly black people. News doesn’t report about white criminals as much a black criminal. This is why people’s image of black is bad. I thought mass media is fearful. Mass media can create people’s mind. Media have to report untold news. And we have to think of information we receive and question it.

Also, this is not related to today’s meetings but I want to share about some things I observed while walking in DC. In DC, there are many garbage cans on the street and we can dump trash easily. Actually, Dusan told me that this is one of his favorite points of DC. I think so too. In Japan, we cannot find garbage cans easily outside so usually we have to find stores and parks, which have garbage cans, or bring the trash back to our homes after carrying it all day. Maybe this is a reason that there is so much trash on the streets of Japan. I don’t understand why Japan doesn’t do the same system of DC or how DC can set garbage cans in so many place. I can’t grasp this as just “difference” and thought this is one of worse point of Japan. I wish I could change Japanese garbage system.


Dealing with stereotypes is a way of life for many of the people on Earth, but so rarely do I hear it brought up in a serious fashion by those around me. Yet when it is, it’s something worth listening to, and today was no different. We heard a variety of narratives, but the one that truly stuck with me was the narrative of Major, a man who had recently been free from jail after six years confined. His style of talking held a lifetime of pain and conflict in it, talking that took thought to communicate effectively, talking that began in his growth.

Free Minds BookSome of the common stereotypes of a black man are that he is uneducated, lazy, and destined for prison. For Major, some of these stereotypes, it seemed, were a cruel way of life created by people simply not caring enough to stop this cycle. He was most definitely not lazy, but he was illiterate for a time and committed crimes out of simple necessity. After all, what would you do if you were hungry — no, starving — and out of options? Exactly. To sum it up in short, this was a way of life for a time, because no one cared. No one was there to redirect Major down a good path in his childhood, no one was there to help him grow, no one was there to allow him to not turn to that life — not until he reached Free Minds, people who cared, people who were consistent.

Nobody was trying to help, and stereotypes were only bars that kept him locked in. In society, we cannot understand anyone until we go beyond their face value. It’s easy to stop at someone’s face and define them off that alone, but that opens the floodgates for more misconceptions to grow, more bigotry to grow, more people to just disregard it. Because we took the time to understand Major, we’ve begun to acknowledge and break down our stereotypes, in turn breaking down ignorance. As Global citizens, that is a coming skill needed. As citizens of our community though? I believe now, more than ever, that the capacity to truly understand another, to empathize, is an obligation. It all starts with little steps, after all. So, until next broadcast.


Today we were able to learn many stories about how the color of your skin could completely change your life. Major, who was taught to steal to live, told us about his eight years he spent in jail and his thoughts about what he did in the past. I was surprised when he said he didn’t regret what he did. He felt in a way thankful for his experiences because he was able to learn many things from them and is currently writing strong, powerful poems to express his thoughts and feelings.


I felt like the discussions we had with Rock Newman today was one the most outstanding moments of the day. Newman talked about his experiences during his childhood dealing with being racially defined as black yet not exactly physically appearing it to others. I think that was a really important topic to bring up because a lot of the time people tend to write off the narratives of multiracial people in this country.

Today, we talked about stereotypes and the African-American experience in the United States. I think this is the first time that I felt invested in because I completely understood it. It feels nice being able to hear the experiences of people directly from their own mouths and not through an interpreter. No offense to interpreters, but having to hear someone else’s words reiterated back through a different language and a different person kind of depreciates the experience of listening to others’ stories for me…

August 3: First Impressions of DC

PROGRAM NOTE: On day one of the DC program, students attended a morning orientation at American Councils, followed by a presentation from Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to introduce the EverydayDC photo project. Then during the afternoon the group of 14 students traveled by chartered bus to areas and neighborhoods across the city, designed to expose them to both the federal Washington and the local “real” DC. The day ended with ice cream in Georgetown.

Aug 3 HS Blog compH.S.

Aug 3 HS Blog2 compSeeing the buildings, I noticed that I couldn’t find any tall buildings like we have in Tokyo. I’m not sure if this is related to the history and the culture of America, but I would like to try finding the reasons. Also, on my way to the American Councils, I took the metro train. Even though the train wasn’t clean, I thought the people on the train were polite. In Japan, people don’t really say “excuse me” when they bump into others, because it is normal for the train to be crowded and people trying to get in, pushing each other. But here, I saw people saying “excuse me” whenever they touched someone, or when it was the station they wanted to get off, and wanted people to move out of their way.


Today, we saw around DC in afternoon. I could find many differences between DC and Japan in the city and it was difficult to see similar points.

One of my surprising observations was that we could see a difference of poverty and wealth by a place. We went to the convergence of two rivers. One side of the river was a place where very wealthy people are living, and opposite side was a place that not so rich people are living. Although I had thought about poor people in the past, I hadn’t thought about the issue of difference between poverty and wealth in Japan. I was shocked. What we saw today are only parts of DC. I look forward to understanding more about DC and America during this program.


The days seem longer here in Washington D.C.; they are long days full of unexpected bombshells and random thunderbolts. On the crammed bus that reeked of sweat, I had the opportunity to take into account some of the daily lives of locals in the urban parts of DC. I want to express my impressions of the people on the streets here, particularly the African Americans we tended to see throughout the whole afternoon. What surprised me most were the overcrowded sidewalks; near the Lincoln Memorial, food trucks were crammed with patient customers. It was not only the number of people in line that caught my eye; I had never seen that many colourful trucks catering food to people on streets. Meanwhile, in a neighbourhood in Anacostia, some topless African American teenagers were on their bikes, enjoying basking in the sun. What left my eyes pinned at them were that most people there didn’t have clothes or “attire” that a majority of people acquire and wear in Japan; in other words, I could see a cultural difference between me and the locals. I also witnessed a cultural difference within one city. It was a fresh experience, as I got an insight into a new world.


As we toured DC I noticed two different points mainly.

What I was surprised at most was the diversity. Regardless of the skin colors and features, they don’t discriminate as much as Japanese do. Almost all people in Japan are Japanese so if there are some foreign people, Japanese avoid communicating with them or communicate as little they can. Japanese are afraid of foreign people even other Asians. It’s a kind of national character but also it’s so strong it can make foreigners feel uncomfortable.

Also there were a lot of memorials in DC to not forget the wars. The people in Tohoku also wanted to tell the stories to the next generation. I think DC would be a kind of example on how to convey and remember something important.

I know there is no better no worse. However the society in US is better for me because there are diverse people. Everyone is welcomed. Sometimes we are forced to be a stereotype in Japan and also discriminated if we are different. I used to be a Chinese and sometimes avoid people in Japan.   It was actually what I felt today but I’m excited to discuss a lot and how my thoughts will be changed.


While we’re taking photos of “Everyday D.C.”, I noticed that there are a lot of food trucks along the main street.

It was interesting because, we don’t have so much food trucks in Japan and it provides people with space and time to communicate with each other even in the hot weather. Also, people in D.C. are outgoing. So, no matter who you are, you can talk to people with some food from food trucks.

Everyday DC Fumiya1Y.A.

DC life started!!

This is my second time to come to U.S. First time, I went to New York, so it is my first time to come to Washington, DC. What caught my eyes here is the height of the buildings. Since it is a capital of the wealthiest country in the world, I thought there would be lots of high buildings as the center of the America. However, the actual buildings I saw today were not very tall; instead, they were large and well-designed like Roman architecture. My host family told me that in DC, the buildings taller than the Washington Monument are not allowed. I thought it is nice and cool that not making Washington just a “business” place but making the place more attractive and really for people live.


On Caitie’s first day in Japan, she mentioned that the city was very colorful. At first, I didn’t understand what she meant; my impression is that huge gray buildings hover over you, shutting out the sunlight and the beautiful blue sky. But now that I saw a little bit of DC, I think I’m starting to understand what she was saying. Signs being very simple and the metro being dark are things that came up during today’s discussion. I also noticed that for ads, they tend to all have the same topic in one area, which makes it seem less busy whereas Japanese ads are all over the place and in many colors and styles.

DC Next!

As the Japanese students have begun to look forward to traveling to Washington, DC for the first time, they each wanted to share what they were looking forward to during the DC program side.


I look forward to trying some local food and meeting with new people to hear their ideas about the world.


I think I can learn about citizenship. I look forward to meeting organizations about social entrepreneurship and what social entrepreneurship looks like in Washington, DC and how it is different from Tohoku. Also, I look forward to experiencing culture on America’s East coast.


I want to learn about the gap between poverty and those with money. Last year, I wrote a report about the income gap and I hope to learn how this problem is addressed in Washington, America and the world.


I look forward to being in a city and environment of all English speakers. I want to improve my English so my visit to Washington will help a lot. By being in the America’s capitol, I hope to experience various perspectives about global problems.


I know the culture is different in America and I would like to learn and observe the differences from Japan. Different people from different nationalities gather in America, especially DC, and I look forward to seeing this with my own eyes.


In Washington I hope to become a better learner. I never got used to the Japanese educational system because Japanese are restrictive and don’t reflect the students’ voices. Classes just provide information to be used on exams, which is frustrating because I’m not a good test taker. I think this experience in D.C. will allow me to gain more useful information to connect to the larger world. I will also be able to play on my strength of storytelling and learning through experience.


While in Washington I look forward to experiencing the diversity of city. I’ve heard a lot about it but I want to experience it for myself. I also hope to get to speak with local Washingtonians to hear their opinions on various issues.


I don’t know a lot about America. I used to live there but I was really young. I want to feel what America is. I hope to learn from the local people and observe the difference between Americans and Japanese. I’m excited about the host family experience and getting to learn about American culture.

Women’s Eye

PROGRAM NOTE: Students visited a local temporary shelter to work with NPO Women’s Eye, which was founded by a TOMODACHI alumnus. Women’s Eye works with area women to empower them to become entrepreneurs and to create small businesses. During their visit, students listened and translated the women’s tsunami disaster stories into English and Japanese. This way whenever the women receive visitors there will be fewer barriers to them sharing their stories of survival.

Womens Eye GroupNina Reyes

Pulling up to the temporary houses I thought I would meet a bunch of women that were still extremely mournful about the tsunami disaster. But as soon as we walked in we were greeted by a group of elderly women smiling from ear to ear. I wasn’t expecting this at all. We broke up into groups and began to ask questions about these women’s stories, so we could translate and transcribe them into English and Japanese booklets. Although I couldn’t understand a single word that was said; I managed to still feel the emotion through the words that were spoken. As I asked questions, thinking they would trigger traumatizing memories, I was given responses back that contained no sad emotions. This was weird. Why were they so happy? But as the stories and translation continued I realized that these women were happy to tell their stories, almost as if it was a step towards their closure with this tragedy.

Womens Eye Nina BookI believe sharing their stories was a part of their healing. They were also teaching a lesson.   Surprisingly, all of them had the same message: In times of natural disasters, “You can buy your house back. You can buy your car back. But you can’t buy your life back.” During the tsunami and earthquake, many people lost their lives to go back for things of sentimental value. But I learned that the only thing that was important was preserving your own life.  The women’s strength gave brightness to a tragedy, lessons to others and a sense of peace to their own hearts.



Womens Eye KY_bookToday, we visited Nakasemachi, a neighborhood of temporary houses. Our objective was to meet with an NPO called Women’s Eye and local residents of Nakasemachi and to hear the stories of the female survivors. During our visit we listened to their survivor stories with the intent of translating the stories into English and Japanese. After the translation we designed pamphlets with pictures and their stories. I was surprised at the residents’ strong mentality and will to share their personal experience of such a devastating tsunami. Despite their outward looks appearing fragile and delicate, they have an inner concrete devotion and strong sense of renewal. I felt the need to spread their story and inform others and recognize the power of their words.

Womens Eye Meeting

K.Y. on Minamisanriku

KY Blog 7.22.15 HomestayWe left Ishinomaki for Minamisanriku today. Having stopped at a few bus stops to actually see the remains of the tsunami, I was once again hit by a wave of emotions. When we finally arrived at Minamisanriku, my body felt like a worn out doll, exhausted. However, I regained the strength when I met my host mother who was to take in five of us. Today we all stayed in a farm stay with women who experienced the tsunami. We followed her home; she literally owned the whole mountain before and behind her house. To add in a few more descriptions, her ancient, two-story house was immense compared to other rural houses, and I got the feeling that the abode was well looked after.

That night, after having an abundance of food, our host mother showed us a documentary of the tsunami in the Miyagi prefecture. While doing this, she was kind enough to share her experiences and ideas about the tsunami. Unfortunately, her husband had risked his life in sacrifice for his comrades. He died so others could live. My eyes swelled with tears when I heard about her persevering and staying strong as a role model to the other people in the neighborhood during the catastrophe. Despite her husband being missing at the time, she hosted several tsunami refugees in her home for two months! She’s a hero in my mind.   Our host mother also had some ideas about the government of Minamisanriku in regards to the reconstruction of the city. She was insisting that the city be built in the highlands, and the coastal area become a garden or playground for children and residents.

Only in a day was I able to listen to an abundance of opinions and information. She was quite critical of the government in Minamisanriku and felt locals deserve more support. I couldn’t help but respect my host mother’s passion for the area and her mental strength post-tsunami.

Keio Shonan Fujisawa Senior High School

K.Y. in Ishinomaki

Blog Ishinomaki KY.7.21.15Today was the first day in the Tohoku region. After arriving at Sendai by bullet train, we transferred for Ishinomaki. Being it my first time in Tohoku, I was curious of how the 3/11 earthquake and tsunami had affected the coastal area. As we all walked on the streets of Ishinomaki, the area which had the most casualties of the tsunami in Japan, I was forced to stop in my tracks; my heart had skipped a beat as in front of me lay the remains of a house. I had only seen footage of Ishinomaki in the news, while living in Houston, so the whole encounter was unexpected. The emotions came from nowhere. There used to be a family living inside the house in front of me; a severe catastrophe had hit them, shredding the house to pieces. I felt irritated and depressed the more I thought about 3/11, because until I got there I had not known about the whole incident.

My encounter with the area acted as a catalyst inside me towards reconstructing my opinions and initial perspective. As this TOMODACHI program is all about telling the story, I plan on doing whatever I can to spread the word and facts about this disaster. In the end of this program, I hope to grow physically and mentally to take a step towards my dreams of working for the United Nations.

Keio Shonan Fujisawa Senior High School

July 19 – Collaborative Haiku

PROGRAM NOTE: On Sunday, July 19th, students had a free day to explore Japan with their host brother or sister.  Together, they wrote one haiku to represent the day!

Burning hot it was
Eating desserts and Monja
Made it all worth it
(Nina and N.Y.)

Clear blue sky, Odaiba
Look down, nice wind from sea
A can by my step

Akiba culture
Being pursued by many
All around the globe
(Jarid and S.M.)

Home of sushi food
I spot a mountain of plates
lost eating challenge…
(Dusan and K.Y.)

It’s hard to describe
Exactly what we did but
The best part was you
(Caitie and N.M.)

Got attacked by food
Monja is better than it looks
It gave us energy
(Y.A. and Korey)

Talking with my friends
heats my heart up nice in
a summer hot day

Hot day in Akihabara
Long walk in electrical world
Don’t play the crane game
(H.S. and Andres)