August 3: First Impressions of DC

PROGRAM NOTE: On day one of the DC program, students attended a morning orientation at American Councils, followed by a presentation from Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to introduce the EverydayDC photo project. Then during the afternoon the group of 14 students traveled by chartered bus to areas and neighborhoods across the city, designed to expose them to both the federal Washington and the local “real” DC. The day ended with ice cream in Georgetown.

Aug 3 HS Blog compH.S.

Aug 3 HS Blog2 compSeeing the buildings, I noticed that I couldn’t find any tall buildings like we have in Tokyo. I’m not sure if this is related to the history and the culture of America, but I would like to try finding the reasons. Also, on my way to the American Councils, I took the metro train. Even though the train wasn’t clean, I thought the people on the train were polite. In Japan, people don’t really say “excuse me” when they bump into others, because it is normal for the train to be crowded and people trying to get in, pushing each other. But here, I saw people saying “excuse me” whenever they touched someone, or when it was the station they wanted to get off, and wanted people to move out of their way.

N.Y.

Today, we saw around DC in afternoon. I could find many differences between DC and Japan in the city and it was difficult to see similar points.

One of my surprising observations was that we could see a difference of poverty and wealth by a place. We went to the convergence of two rivers. One side of the river was a place where very wealthy people are living, and opposite side was a place that not so rich people are living. Although I had thought about poor people in the past, I hadn’t thought about the issue of difference between poverty and wealth in Japan. I was shocked. What we saw today are only parts of DC. I look forward to understanding more about DC and America during this program.

K.Y.

The days seem longer here in Washington D.C.; they are long days full of unexpected bombshells and random thunderbolts. On the crammed bus that reeked of sweat, I had the opportunity to take into account some of the daily lives of locals in the urban parts of DC. I want to express my impressions of the people on the streets here, particularly the African Americans we tended to see throughout the whole afternoon. What surprised me most were the overcrowded sidewalks; near the Lincoln Memorial, food trucks were crammed with patient customers. It was not only the number of people in line that caught my eye; I had never seen that many colourful trucks catering food to people on streets. Meanwhile, in a neighbourhood in Anacostia, some topless African American teenagers were on their bikes, enjoying basking in the sun. What left my eyes pinned at them were that most people there didn’t have clothes or “attire” that a majority of people acquire and wear in Japan; in other words, I could see a cultural difference between me and the locals. I also witnessed a cultural difference within one city. It was a fresh experience, as I got an insight into a new world.

Shigetatsu

As we toured DC I noticed two different points mainly.

What I was surprised at most was the diversity. Regardless of the skin colors and features, they don’t discriminate as much as Japanese do. Almost all people in Japan are Japanese so if there are some foreign people, Japanese avoid communicating with them or communicate as little they can. Japanese are afraid of foreign people even other Asians. It’s a kind of national character but also it’s so strong it can make foreigners feel uncomfortable.

Also there were a lot of memorials in DC to not forget the wars. The people in Tohoku also wanted to tell the stories to the next generation. I think DC would be a kind of example on how to convey and remember something important.

I know there is no better no worse. However the society in US is better for me because there are diverse people. Everyone is welcomed. Sometimes we are forced to be a stereotype in Japan and also discriminated if we are different. I used to be a Chinese and sometimes avoid people in Japan.   It was actually what I felt today but I’m excited to discuss a lot and how my thoughts will be changed.

Fumiya

While we’re taking photos of “Everyday D.C.”, I noticed that there are a lot of food trucks along the main street.

It was interesting because, we don’t have so much food trucks in Japan and it provides people with space and time to communicate with each other even in the hot weather. Also, people in D.C. are outgoing. So, no matter who you are, you can talk to people with some food from food trucks.

Everyday DC Fumiya1Y.A.

DC life started!!

This is my second time to come to U.S. First time, I went to New York, so it is my first time to come to Washington, DC. What caught my eyes here is the height of the buildings. Since it is a capital of the wealthiest country in the world, I thought there would be lots of high buildings as the center of the America. However, the actual buildings I saw today were not very tall; instead, they were large and well-designed like Roman architecture. My host family told me that in DC, the buildings taller than the Washington Monument are not allowed. I thought it is nice and cool that not making Washington just a “business” place but making the place more attractive and really for people live.

N.M.

On Caitie’s first day in Japan, she mentioned that the city was very colorful. At first, I didn’t understand what she meant; my impression is that huge gray buildings hover over you, shutting out the sunlight and the beautiful blue sky. But now that I saw a little bit of DC, I think I’m starting to understand what she was saying. Signs being very simple and the metro being dark are things that came up during today’s discussion. I also noticed that for ads, they tend to all have the same topic in one area, which makes it seem less busy whereas Japanese ads are all over the place and in many colors and styles.

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